Initially development was under a PC / Windows XP platform, however in late 2010 development was switched to the Apple iMac is a better platform.

Desktop - main development platform VirtualBox
iMAc 21" screen 1TB disc, 3.06 GHz Intel i5 dual core, 12 GB DDR memory

Windows XP SP3

Ubunto

Distro Astro

Links: http://osxdaily.com : https://discussions.apple.com/index.jspa :



Taking Screenshots in Mac OS X

* Command-Shift-3: Take a screenshot of the screen, and save it as a file on the desktop
* Command-Shift-4, then select an area: Take a screenshot of an area and save it as a file on the desktop
* Command-Shift-4, then space, then click a window: Take a screenshot of a window and save it as a file on the desktop
* Command-Control-Shift-3: Take a screenshot of the screen, and save it to the clipboard
* Command-Control-Shift-4, then select an area: Take a screenshot of an area and save it to the clipboard
* Command-Control-Shift-4, then space, then click a window: Take a screenshot of a window and save it to the clipboard

In Leopard, the following keys can be held down while selecting an area (via Command-Shift-4 or Command-Control-Shift-4):

* Space, to lock the size of the selected region and instead move it when the mouse moves
* Shift, to resize only one edge of the selected region
* Option, to resize the selected region with its center as the anchor point

Formats

Different versions of Mac OS X have different formats for screenshots.

* Mac OS X 10.2 (Jaguar): jpg
* Mac OS X 10.3 (Panther): pdf
* Mac OS X 10.4 (Tiger) and later: png

Changing the screen capture file format

You can change the default file type for screen captures (png) by using a terminal command. Most major image formats are supported including PNG, PDF, GIF, TIFF, and JPG, we’ll go with JPG since that is a common type of web graphic (however we try and use PNG in the Lab):

defaults write com.apple.screencapture type jpg

Then you must kill the SystemUIServer for changes to take effect:

killall SystemUIServer

Important - Backups

Splitting the disc also makes backups very easy, simply select all directories / folders in drive D: and copy and paste to a convenient backup device, e.g. external hard drive or DVD-ROM.  I do not bother backing up C: drive as the time it takes to either reinstall from CD or a backup of the downloaded application, or even re-download from the net is minimal, considering this only happens infrequently and is usually only when I re-build a new machine or want to completely clean up C: for performance reasons.  In this project the main files are also backed up by the fact they exist in an external web site and in the case of the actual application it exists on sourceforge.net in a ZIP format,  also being in 'HTML' format the 'programs' are the source code. Additional disaster recovery is provided by the Apple G4 Powerbook which contains a copy of the project folders updated on a regular basis.

You can of course get software that will back up your drive(s) to tape, CD, DVD or external hard disk, you can even back up your entire drive as an image that can be written back over a replacement drive. This level of backup  is recommended for large and critical systems,  however the fact that large capacity external drives have come down in cost means it is more convenient from my point of view to simply back up the data from my D: drive to one (or more) external drives, my 250GB Iomega USB/Firewire drive can hold many copies of my data folders in separate folders named to include the date of the backup. The other advantage with a hard drive is the data is also instantly accessible as it is not compressed or in some 'tape format' (a tape backup is no use unless you know it can be restored! - first law of IT, you shall keep a backup you know can be restored)

The other option with critical systems is to use multiple drives in a RAID array to cope with individual disc failure, and backup the data as well. This is not necessary at the sort of level we are working at here so will not be covered any further.

Info - Mac Life